Tea at Trianon Forum
Always be polite. Courtesy is required of you.
Tea with the Queen
Latest topics
» Remembering Louis XVI
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptyWed Jan 22, 2020 10:04 am by vendéenne d'âme

» Mass for Louis XVI on live video
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptyTue Jan 21, 2020 6:10 pm by vendéenne d'âme

» Judges 17:6
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptyThu Jan 16, 2020 11:29 pm by vendéenne d'âme

» War in the Vendée/Guerre de Vendée
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptyThu Jan 09, 2020 4:37 pm by vendéenne d'âme

» The Comte de Chambord (Henri V)
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptySun Jan 05, 2020 5:24 pm by vendéenne d'âme

» Reflection: Les Membres et L'Estomac
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptySun Jan 05, 2020 2:35 am by vendéenne d'âme

» The Habsburg Appreciation Thread
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptySun Jan 05, 2020 12:45 am by vendéenne d'âme

» The Great Monarch
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptyThu Dec 19, 2019 11:21 pm by Elena

» Jews in Royal France
Saint Joan and the Royal House of France EmptyFri Mar 23, 2018 10:49 pm by princess garnet

Who is online?
In total there are 2 users online :: 0 Registered, 0 Hidden and 2 Guests

None

[ View the whole list ]


Most users ever online was 70 on Mon Jul 27, 2015 8:35 pm
Social bookmarking

Social bookmarking reddit  Social bookmarking google      

Bookmark and share the address of Tea at Trianon Forum on your social bookmarking website

Banner art courtesy of The Graphics Fairy.

Saint Joan and the Royal House of France

Go down

Saint Joan and the Royal House of France Empty Saint Joan and the Royal House of France

Post  Mata Hari on Tue Oct 25, 2011 10:35 pm

I always loved this article from Tea at Trianon:
http://teaattrianon.blogspot.com/2007/05/st-joan-and-royal-house-of-france.html

Most Catholics, I have concluded, do not have trouble accepting the fact that St. Joan of Arc donned male apparel and led armies to victory. What seems to disturb many people, however, is that she gave her help to a king, and worse yet, to a King of France. Many Americans seem to be convinced that monarchy is an intrinsically evil institution. They are not able to see beyond their own time and their own political process. I recently read a comment in which someone said that St. Louis of France was a saint "in spite of being a king." May I be so bold as to suggest that St. Louis saw his kingship as a vocation in which he served God and man. What is more, he saw it as a calling to share in the Kingship of Christ, from Whom he held his authority and to Whom he had to render an account. St. Joan, in her simple piety, viewed kingship in a similar manner. She honored her King Charles VII, although he was far from being a saint, because in doing so she gave honor to Christ the King. The office was deserving of respect, even if the man was not. On her banner she bore an image of Christ the King surrounded by the fleur de lys, the lilies of royal France.

In a small volume entitled Joan of Arc In Her Own Words there are many quotations of St. Joan which make explicit reference to the fact that she was called to serve God by assisting the French monarch. She said: "[St. Michael] told me the pitiful state of the Kingdom of France. And he told me that I must succor the King of France." To Robert de Baudricourt she insisted: "The Kingdom of France is not the Dauphin's but my Lord's. But my Lord wills that the Dauphin shall be made King and have the Kingdom in custody. The Dauphin shall be King in spite of his enemies, and I shall lead him to his anointing." She welcomed the Duc d'Alençon by saying: "The more there are gathered together of the blood of the King of France, the better it will be." In her letter to the English lords, Joan dictated: "Do justice to the King of Heaven; surrender to the Maid, who is sent here from God to uphold the blood royal."

Joan placed great store upon the mystical aspects of the coronation ceremony, telling the royal council: "When once the King is crowned and anointed, his enemies' strength will steadily grow less, and finally they will have no power to harm him or the Kingdom." At her trial she announced:

As for the good work I have done...I must needs leave that with the King of Heaven, who sent me to Charles, son of Charles King of France, who shall be King. And you shall see that the French will very soon achieve a great task which God will send to the French, and such that almost the whole Kingdom of France will tremble. And I say it, so that when it comes to pass it will be remembered that I said it.

The Maid believed her country had a mission from God, a task to fulfill.

There are also some odd connections between St. Joan and Queen Marie-Antoinette. At first glance no two people appear to be as different from each other as the Habsburg archduchess and the peasant girl from Domrémy, other than a shared love for children and needlework. Joan has often been referred to as the "Maid of Lorraine" or even as "Joan of Lorraine." Father Jean-Marie Charles-Roux, in building a case for the martyrdom of Marie-Antoinette in his book Louis XVII: La Mère et l'Enfant martyrs, points out that the queen's full name was Marie-Antoinette-Josèphe-Jeanne de Lorraine, even as the Maid was Jeanne de Lorraine. Both women were called to their "mission" at age thirteen. At thirteen, Joan began to hear her voices; at thirteen, Marie-Antoinette was told she was to marry the heir to the French throne. Both were known for their personal modesty, and yet both were branded by enemies with the epithet of "whore." Both the queen and the peasant have had their reputations shredded beyond recognition. Both suffered the ordeal of a long imprisonment in which they suffered humiliating outrages. Both were forced to defend themselves against calumnies and half-truths amid the scrutiny of a public trial. Both persisted in their loyalty to the Holy See. Both were condemned to an ignominious death and each were taken to the scaffold in a cart. Unlike St. Joan, Marie-Antoinette never had a posthumous retrial. She was never officially vindicated and her name continues to be slandered in books and movies to this day. May the prayers of St. Joan bring the truth to light.

_________________
Because I really did not spy, it is terrible that I cannot defend myself.
Mata Hari
Mata Hari

Posts : 201
Join date : 2011-10-20
Location : Paris

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mata_Hari

Back to top Go down

Saint Joan and the Royal House of France Empty Re: Saint Joan and the Royal House of France

Post  Elena on Mon Nov 14, 2011 8:59 pm

"O how beautiful is the chaste generation with glory: for the memory thereof is immortal...." Wisdom 4:1

On Wednesday, May 30, 1431, the Vigil of Corpus Christi, Jehanne Darc, or Jehanne la Pucelle, "the Maid," as she called herself, was led into the public square of Rouen by enemy soldiers to where the stake awaited her. It was noon. Nineteen years old, her head shaven, surrounded by placards branding her a witch, idolatress, and abjured heretic, she invoked the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, and St Michael the Archangel. She had been calumniated and condemned by those whose holy office it was to guide and protect her soul; she had been exposed to lewdness and impurity by those whose sacred duty it was to shelter her innocence and virginity. She was abandoned by the king whose crown her victories had won. She was in great interior darkness; the voices of her saints were silent.

Although she conversed with angels and saints, Joan the Maid was known to be practical and blunt. Very feminine, she missed her embroidery and her mother, yet she emerges on the pages of late medieval history like someone from the Acts of the Apostles. Surrounded by miracles, she was herself a Miracle; she led an army to victory at the age of 17, an illiterate peasant girl, who knew nothing of war or politics. She saved France as a nation, for it had all but ceased to exist when she came on the scene.

Such was her Faith that she confounded her judges, while exhausted, frightened and pushed to the breaking point of her mental and physical strength. Denied the Sacraments by her persecutors, she gazed upon the upheld crucifix, calling out, "Jesus! Jesus!" as the flames consumed her. When Joan's ashes were scattered in the river, her heart was found, untouched by the flames, and still bleeding.

"If I walk in the midst of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil, for Thou art with me, O Lord Jesus." Communion Antiphon for the Feast of St Joan

St. Joan, pray for us!

_________________
Je pardonne à tous mes ennemis le mal qu’ils m’ont fait.
Elena
Elena
Admin

Posts : 1167
Join date : 2011-10-18
Location : East of the Sun, West of the Moon

http://www.emvidal.com/

Back to top Go down

Saint Joan and the Royal House of France Empty Joan and St. Therese of Lisieux

Post  J.C. Marrero on Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:07 pm

St. Therese (1873-1897) deeply loved Joan of Arc, who had not yet been beatified during Therese's short life.. As a Carmelite nun, Therese wrote a play about Joan and posed for pictures as the Maid, wearing a wig and armour made of tinsel and dark blue cloth. The costume and the faux sword she held can be seen today in the Carmel's museum in Lisieux. Therese, who wrote the play for one of the convent's feastday celebrations, played the role of Joan and ironically narrowly escaped serious burns when the camera used to take her pictures in costume "misfired".

Joan was the only historical figure, other than purely religious ones, about whom Therese wrote extensively. Now, of course, the two are co-secondary patrons of France after the Mother of God.

It would have been interesting if Therese had written about the Revolution, the martyred monarchs and even Charlotte Corday, who had close associations with Lisieux. The only reference I've seen to Louis XVI in her writings comes from a school work book, wherein she simply notes that he had been guillotined. Therese deeply loved France, but on the painful subject of the Revolution she was silent. My supposition is that her charitable instincts always kept her from polemics and her love of Joan of Arc, who fought to crown a French king, said it all.

J.C. Marrero

Posts : 3
Join date : 2011-10-24

Back to top Go down

Saint Joan and the Royal House of France Empty Re: Saint Joan and the Royal House of France

Post  Elena on Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:17 pm

Great reflections! I have always wondered about the same thing. St. Therese always called her father the "King of France and Navarre" (Louis' title) while her father called her "my little Queen" or "Queen of France and Navarre" (Marie-Antoinette's title.)

_________________
Je pardonne à tous mes ennemis le mal qu’ils m’ont fait.
Elena
Elena
Admin

Posts : 1167
Join date : 2011-10-18
Location : East of the Sun, West of the Moon

http://www.emvidal.com/

Back to top Go down

Saint Joan and the Royal House of France Empty Re: Saint Joan and the Royal House of France

Post  May on Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:07 pm

Fascinating! I am sure that the spiritual heroism of Louis XVI, Marie-Antoinette and others martyred during the Revolution won great graces for later French saints.
May
May

Posts : 488
Join date : 2011-10-24
Location : United States

http://crossoflaeken.blogspot.com

Back to top Go down

Saint Joan and the Royal House of France Empty Re: Saint Joan and the Royal House of France

Post  Elena on Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:18 pm

Yes, so many great saints lived in the century which followed the Revolution.

_________________
Je pardonne à tous mes ennemis le mal qu’ils m’ont fait.
Elena
Elena
Admin

Posts : 1167
Join date : 2011-10-18
Location : East of the Sun, West of the Moon

http://www.emvidal.com/

Back to top Go down

Saint Joan and the Royal House of France Empty Re: Saint Joan and the Royal House of France

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum