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Robert Burns

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Robert Burns

Post  Duchess Lylia on Sat Oct 29, 2011 1:52 am

I recently found a book of poetry that my grandfather loved and cherished for many words. These verses jumped out at me:

O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us
To see oursels as ithers see us!
It wad frae mony a blunder free us,
An' foolish notion:
What airs in dress an' gait wad lea'e us,
An' ev'n devotion!

(Natually, I turned to Google to learn more, and discovered that this poem is entitled "To A Louse, On Seeing One on a Lady's Bonnet at Church," and was written in 1786.) I think Burns' poems are remarkably vital and compelling. Any fellow fans out there?

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Re: Robert Burns

Post  Duchess Lylia on Sat Oct 29, 2011 1:54 am

I meant to say "cherished for many years."

This is what happens when I work a full day and try to write coherently past midnight . . .

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Re: Robert Burns

Post  Elena on Sat Oct 29, 2011 8:22 am

Duchess Lylia wrote:I meant to say "cherished for many years."

This is what happens when I work a full day and try to write coherently past midnight . . .

I've been there....It's not fun. No

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Re: Robert Burns

Post  Elena on Sat Oct 29, 2011 8:23 am

Duchess Lylia wrote:I recently found a book of poetry that my grandfather loved and cherished for many words. These verses jumped out at me:

O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us
To see oursels as ithers see us!
It wad frae mony a blunder free us,
An' foolish notion:
What airs in dress an' gait wad lea'e us,
An' ev'n devotion!

(Natually, I turned to Google to learn more, and discovered that this poem is entitled "To A Louse, On Seeing One on a Lady's Bonnet at Church," and was written in 1786.) I think Burns' poems are remarkably vital and compelling. Any fellow fans out there?

I am an ardent fan of Burns and have been since childhood. I love My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose.

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Re: Robert Burns

Post  Elena on Sat Oct 29, 2011 10:30 pm

Here are some posts about the background of the poem "Highland Mary."

http://teaattrianon.blogspot.com/2010/09/highland-mary.html

http://goldenagepaintings.blogspot.com/2010/09/james-archer-betrothal-of-robert-burns.html
Although painted circa 1881 by which time he was living in London, Archer looks back to his Scottish history and takes an incident in the life of Scotland's most celebrated poet Robert Burns (1759-1796) as the subject for this painting. Burns' great love was Jean Armour, the daughter of a master-mason, whom he eventually married. Their courtship, however, was tempestuous and in the spring of 1786, after Jean had destroyed the document that testified to their commitment to marry upon discovering she was pregnant by him, she was sent off to Paisley to stay with relatives and avoid scandal. Burns went into hiding and turned for consolation to another girl, Mary Campbell, whom he called his 'Highland Mary'. She was a dairymaid at Coilsfield, an estate near the village of Mauchline in Ayrshire. Despite meeting at Failford on 14 May 1786 and pledging to marry, the episode came to nothing as Mary died of a fever at Greenock shortly afterwards.

This subject is also treated by W.H. Midwood in 1864 in which Burns exchanged Bibles with 'Highland Mary' over a running stream at Failford - a Scottish custom which signified betrothal. In the present picture a Bible can be seen in the cap on the ground beneath Burns' feet and the river Ayr is behind the couple. The two-volume Bible Burns gave Mary Campbell is preserved in the Burns' Museum at Alloway.
There is a monument on the banks of the Fail Burn that marks this event and bears the verse from Burns' poem To Mary in Heaven written by Burns around the third anniversary of Mary Campbell's death

'That sacred hour can I forget,
Can I forget the hallow'd grove,
Where, by the winding Ayr we met,
To live one day of parting love?'


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Auld Lang Syne

Post  Elena on Sat Dec 31, 2011 8:41 pm

The original verses of Burns:
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind ?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne* ?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my jo (or my dear),
for auld lang syne,
we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp !
and surely I’ll be mine !
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We twa hae run about the braes,
and pu’d the gowans fine ;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
sin auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We twa hae paidl’d i' the burn,
frae morning sun till dine ;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
sin auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere !
and gie's a hand o’ thine !
And we’ll tak a right gude-willy waught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

More here: http://teaattrianon.blogspot.com/2009/12/auld-lang-syne.html

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Re: Robert Burns

Post  janet11 on Thu Apr 27, 2017 6:09 am

the poet is hard for me to understand

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Re: Robert Burns

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