Tea at Trianon Forum
Always be polite. Courtesy is required of you.
Tea with the Queen
Latest topics
» Do you want a cup of Afternoon tea?
Tue May 02, 2017 10:56 pm by janet11

»  Tea and Sleep
Fri Apr 28, 2017 4:54 am by janet11

» Faux Pecan Pie
Thu Apr 27, 2017 6:38 am by janet11

» Jacqueline Marie Evancho
Thu Apr 27, 2017 6:18 am by janet11

» Robert Burns
Thu Apr 27, 2017 6:09 am by janet11

» Poems of Kateri Lanthier
Thu Apr 27, 2017 5:47 am by janet11

» "country music
Thu Apr 27, 2017 5:43 am by janet11

» Enjoy tea and enjoy life
Thu Apr 27, 2017 5:14 am by janet11

» Mary Cassatt
Wed Apr 26, 2017 6:27 am by janet11

Who is online?
In total there is 0 user online :: 0 Registered, 0 Hidden and 0 Guests :: 1 Bot

None

[ View the whole list ]


Most users ever online was 70 on Mon Jul 27, 2015 8:35 pm
Social bookmarking

Social bookmarking Digg  Social bookmarking Delicious  Social bookmarking Reddit  Social bookmarking Stumbleupon  Social bookmarking Slashdot  Social bookmarking Yahoo  Social bookmarking Google  Social bookmarking Blinklist  Social bookmarking Blogmarks  Social bookmarking Technorati  

Bookmark and share the address of Tea at Trianon Forum on your social bookmarking website

Banner art courtesy of The Graphics Fairy.

The Scarlet Pimpernel

View previous topic View next topic Go down

The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  Bunnies on Fri Mar 01, 2013 7:13 pm

So what is everyone's opinion on The Scarlet Pimpernel series - in any of its mediums, ranging from books, to films, television specials, mini-series, etc.

I'm rather fond of the story myself. It's grossly inaccurate, of course, and probably rivals Dickens when it comes to infecting the populace with misconceptions as to the mechanisms of the Terror (the most notable being that the French were not the Russian Revoutionaries and never even bothered trying to execute all former aristocrats?) but oh, it's delightful in any case.

Also, as a rabid Batman fan, I gotta tip my hat to Bob Kane's inspiration.

avatar
Bunnies

Posts : 199
Join date : 2012-12-24
Age : 24

View user profile http://bunniesandbeheadings.tumblr.com

Back to top Go down

Re: The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  Elena on Fri Mar 01, 2013 8:55 pm

I love the book by Baroness Orczy and I love the film with Merle Oberon.

http://teaattrianon.blogspot.com/2008/02/baroness-orczy.html
When I first read Baroness Orczy's novel of the French Revolution The Scarlet Pimpernel as a college student, I thought it to be one of the most romantic love stories I had ever read. I still do. Emmuska Orczy (1865-1947) was a fascinating lady who had witnessed the destruction of an uprising first hand in her native Hungary. She loved painting but took up writing as an effort to ameliorate her family's genteel poverty, and she was quite successful.

_________________
Je pardonne à tous mes ennemis le mal qu’ils m’ont fait.
avatar
Elena
Admin

Posts : 1164
Join date : 2011-10-18
Location : East of the Sun, West of the Moon

View user profile http://www.emvidal.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  princess garnet on Sat Mar 02, 2013 6:37 pm

I've seen the one with Jane Seymour as Marguerite in the 1982 version:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0084637/?ref_=sr_2
Several well-known names are in it.

princess garnet

Posts : 202
Join date : 2011-10-24
Location : Maryland

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  Mata Hari on Sat Mar 02, 2013 6:43 pm

I LOVE the one with Jane Seymour!! That is probably my favorite!! cheers

_________________
Because I really did not spy, it is terrible that I cannot defend myself.
avatar
Mata Hari

Posts : 201
Join date : 2011-10-20
Location : Paris

View user profile http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mata_Hari

Back to top Go down

Re: The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  Silver Rose on Thu Aug 22, 2013 3:12 am

I grew up watching the version with Anthony Andrews and Jane Seymour . . . definitely one of my favorite movies! Smile I read the book several years later. It is different from the movie (especially at the end), but wonderful, as well.

Silver Rose

Posts : 3
Join date : 2013-08-18

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  Bunnies on Thu Aug 22, 2013 9:19 am

The Anthony Andrews version was actually the first film I had ever seen focusing on the French Revolution. It left quite an impression, let me tell. you.

Objectively speaking, I do believe Andrews' version is the best. It remains relatively true to the book without becoming clunky and it manages to keep its audiences attention. That said, my personal favorite is the 1999 version. The fanbase tends to hate it since it strayed from the books and I admit that its flaws are legion - but I adore the dynamic between Marguerite and Chauvelin, the political nuances portrayed in the Vendee, Ronan Vibert's delightfully demonic Robespierre, and the moral gray of the Pimpernel. It's just so fun and I've probably seen the series dozens of times now... Embarassed 
avatar
Bunnies

Posts : 199
Join date : 2012-12-24
Age : 24

View user profile http://bunniesandbeheadings.tumblr.com

Back to top Go down

Re: The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  Elena on Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:12 pm

I love the novel and the film with Merle Oberon.

_________________
Je pardonne à tous mes ennemis le mal qu’ils m’ont fait.
avatar
Elena
Admin

Posts : 1164
Join date : 2011-10-18
Location : East of the Sun, West of the Moon

View user profile http://www.emvidal.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  Elena on Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:18 pm

Here is a post I did about Baroness Orczy, the author of the book.
http://teaattrianon.blogspot.com/2008/02/baroness-orczy.html

When I first read Baroness Orczy's novel of the French Revolution The Scarlet Pimpernel as a college student, I thought it to be one of the most romantic love stories I had ever read. I still do. Emmuska Orczy (1865-1947) was a fascinating lady who had witnessed the destruction of an uprising first hand in her native Hungary. She loved painting but took up writing as an effort to ameliorate her family's genteel poverty, and she was quite successful. Here is a short description of her life:

When Baroness Orczy (pronounced "OR-see") created the gallant and beautiful aristocrats of The Scarlet Pimpernel, she was writing partly out of her own experience. Born in 1865, the only child of a Hungarian baron, she was herself an aristocrat. And although unrest in Hungary made her father give up the family's holding and leave the country when she was just a little girl, all her life she proudly used her title. When she began writing her novels, she signed them not "Emmuska" (or more properly, "Emma Magdalena Rosalia Maria Josefa Barbara Orczy"), but "Baroness Orczy".

Intense, witty, darkly attractive, she was a welcome guest at all the highest courts of Europe. She dressed in rich, low-cut gowns, in heirloom jewels and wondrous hats, at least one of which - broad brimmed, decorated with a huge curling ostrich feather - was just such a dashing hat as her heroine wore while making her grand entry in The Scarlet Pimpernel. It is quite possible that Baroness Orczy patterned her heroine after herself. This woman, Marguerite Blakeney, the French actress, the charming but independent woman with lovely face, sensitive nature, superior mind - this might have been the woman Baroness Orczy wanted to be. As much as she was born an aristocrat, Baroness Orczy was raised a cosmopolitan. She lived in Brussels, Budapest, London, Paris, and Monte Carlo. She studied music on the continent, art in Great Britain. "Before I reached my teens," she wrote, "I could already jabber in three languages without a trace of a foreign accent." This was before she knew English, which she began to learn at the age of fifteen! When she decided that she did not possess the "sacré feu" (sacred fire) necessary to make her a great painter, she started using her facility with language to create pictures with words. And despite her Hungarian birth and continental upbringing she chose English as the language in which to write. She married an artist and remained devoted to him all her life; by her own account, her marriage was blissfully happy. Also by her own account, some of the happiest days of all were the five weeks during which she wrote the novel by which she is still remembered, The Scarlet Pimpernel. Published in 1905, it became popular almost at once, and Baroness Orczy became somewhat of a celebrity.Though she lived a life of wealth, privilege, and fame, before the end she experienced herself that dark threat of what she had written, that shadowy side of being an aristocrat, that danger of capture and death. During World War II she and her husband were trapped in Monte Carlo when the Nazis invaded France. For the next five years they lived within a stone's throw of the German Gestapo headquarters, afraid to speak English in public. Her husband died in this exile. Her longtime maidservant was arrested by the Italians, and despite months of effort Baroness Orczy could not obtain the Englishwoman's release. She was left utterly alone in a "neutral" state overrun by all England's enemies. Her home was bombed by the R.A.F. just before Monte Carlo was liberated. An old woman, she died soon afterward, in London, in 1947.

Old, but not broken. Her passion, her verve, her romantic and indeed flamboyant love of life, stayed with her to the end, and live after her in The Scarlet Pimpernel.
Baroness Orczy also wrote a little known biography about Caroline of Naples, the Duchesse d'Angouleme's sister-in-law, entitled The Turbulent Duchess. It was a great help to me when writing Madame Royale.

_________________
Je pardonne à tous mes ennemis le mal qu’ils m’ont fait.
avatar
Elena
Admin

Posts : 1164
Join date : 2011-10-18
Location : East of the Sun, West of the Moon

View user profile http://www.emvidal.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: The Scarlet Pimpernel

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum